Pentecostal Movement

This has been included as an avenue for further study. Many researchers have come across ancestors that seemingly moved between countries. This is one area of study I feel may answer some of those questions we have. With Jon's help maybe we can collect some of those names that were active in acting as missionaries etc. to other countries.

Information

I, too, was very surprised to learn of the dramatic involvement of Italian immigrants and Italian-Americans in the spread and ultimate dominance of Pentecostalism in the world of Christiandom. As of the mid 1990's, Pentecostalism was the second largest group of Christians in the world, second only to Catholicism. Italians and Germans are equally noted as being the ethnic force behind the early growth of this form of Christianity.

The Italian Pentecostal Movement began approximately 1904 with a break from the Italian Presbyterian Church (possibly a segment of the Presbyterian denomination - vice - only a single church, I need more research in this area) over issues of church governance in Chicago. The leaders of the break-away congregation, in ca. 1910 attended a revival series led by William Durham in Chicago and received the "Baptism in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in tongues."

This is a near quote from some of the material I've read in the Antonio deGregorio Collection so far. I've only worked through ¼ of the material to date.

From Chicago, Christians took the word out into the world - literally! With trips in the US and to South America and to Italy. Initial research shows that the early leaders were from the region of Tuscany (Florence, Siena, Pisa, Bologna, etc.) but quickly the work spread to the southern regions (the Mesogiorno) and Sicily. In fact, again, early research shows that early work in central Italy met in little success, but when the missionaries went south - especially Sicily - it took off with great success.

Antonio deGregorio Collection, David duPlessis Center and Archive, Pasadena, CA contains 115 biographies and autobiographies (some in Italian) on leaders in the Italian Pentecostal Movement. It also contains 50 draft histories on various Italian congregations belonging primarily to the CCNA (Christian Churches of North America) - despite the name, it is an organization developed and still principally governed by Italian-Americans. CCNA maintains its own webpages as well.

There is only one archivist at the dePlessis Center, so depending on requests and needs - vice - other demands on her time, she may be able to offer some assistance. The deGregorio Collection has not been processed. Part of my work with the collection will yield its being processed. In fact, the archivist, has promised to start work on processing it as soon as she completes the collection she is currently working on. This in turn will make it easier and quicker to obtain specific data.

I hope to produce a document that will be helpful to the greater community.

Jon

Subject: Italian American Pentecostal Movement

From: "Jon Watt" <[email protected]

Ciao a tutti,

I am Jon Watt, I am currently pursuing my second masters at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). My first was in theology and cross-cultural studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. This one is in US history with a focus on church issues. For my thesis I am looking at the religious experience of Italian immigrants and 1st/2nd generation Italian-Americans from 1880 to at least 1950. There are several questions that I will be pursuing - of course, but the primary issues will look at the Italian Pentecostal Movement beginning with the Italian Presbyterian Church in Chicago - 1904. I will be using the Antonio deGregorio Collection. This in turn looks at the Assemblea Cristiana and the impact that Italian-Americans had on the growth of one of America's greatest contributions to Christiandom. Pentecostalism in now second only to Roman Catholicism on a worldwide basis.

My ties to the Italian community are long and varied. In my early adult years, I spent 6 years living in Italy and can communicate in Italian to a certain degree.Thus my interests in studying Italian issues come from many sources and receive a lot of support in my extended family.

If anyone on the list is acquainted with Italian pentecostalism or has info, please email me.
Thank you.

Jon Watt
Acting Dean, Pahrump Valley Bible Institute
University of Nevada, Las Vegas - history grad student.


Antonio deGregorio Collection

* Please note this collection has not been processed and is not available to the public

Antonio deGregorio Collection, David duPlessis Center and Archive, Pasadena, CA contains 115 biographies and autobiographies (some in Italian) on leaders in the Italian Pentecostal Movement. It also contains 50 draft histories on various Italian congregations belonging primarily to the CCNA (Christian Churches of North America) - despite the name, it is an organization developed and still principally governed by Italian-Americans. CCNA maintains its own webpages as well.

There is only one archivist at the dePlessis Center. The deGregorio Collection has not been processed. Part of my work with the collection will yield its being processed. In fact, the archivist, has promised to start work on processing it as soon as she completes the collection she is currently working on. This in turn will make it easier and quicker to obtain specific data.